A couple of translation questions

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raevin
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A couple of translation questions

Post by raevin » Thu 06.30.2005 9:59 am

Ok, I'm a little confused on this part...question 1:

"Ame" is always in kanji form (雨), which translators can translate...but if I put in "あめ", it doesn't translate...why is that? I mean, they both mean "ame".

Another question is, if "wa" is always written as は, then why is the hiragana わ?

mandie2484
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RE: A couple of translation questions

Post by mandie2484 » Thu 06.30.2005 10:37 am

I'm not quite sure what you mean about the translator, but I think the answer to your question is that "ame" actually has more than one meaning depending on how you prononce it. Ame (use a lower tone on "meh") means rain, and aME (higher tone on "meh") means candy. My japapnese teacher used to say "Go up for candy, down for rain". If you use hiragana, you can't tell which one you mean without the rest of the sentence, but the kanji for each is different. I hope that makes sense.

As for "wa", it is only used as "ha" for a subject marker.
ex. Watashi WA(ha)

The actual "wa" is used when it's not the subject marker.
ex. WAtashi

I wish I had japanese on my browser to show you exactly what I mean, but I hope this helps all the same.

raevin
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RE: A couple of translation questions

Post by raevin » Thu 06.30.2005 10:56 am

mandie2484 wrote:
I'm not quite sure what you mean about the translator, but I think the answer to your question is that "ame" actually has more than one meaning depending on how you prononce it. Ame (use a lower tone on "meh") means rain, and aME (higher tone on "meh") means candy. My japapnese teacher used to say "Go up for candy, down for rain". If you use hiragana, you can't tell which one you mean without the rest of the sentence, but the kanji for each is different. I hope that makes sense.
I was using the AltvaVista translator, and...yea (heh).

Anywho...thanks for clarifying that for me. It makes more sense now...heh.
As for "wa", it is only used as "ha" for a subject marker.
ex. Watashi WA(ha)

The actual "wa" is used when it's not the subject marker.
ex. WAtashi

I wish I had japanese on my browser to show you exactly what I mean, but I hope this helps all the same.
Ah, okay. That's what I was thinking to, but wasn't to sure. Thanks again for clarifying :D.

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Harisenbon
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RE: A couple of translation questions

Post by Harisenbon » Thu 06.30.2005 6:23 pm

The altavista translator is horrid. Use Jim Breen's translator. It's not a pure translator, but actually gives you the definition of each word in the sentence. Very handy for study.

http://www.aa.tufs.ac.jp/~jwb/cgi-bin/wwwjdic.cgi?9T
Want to learn Japanese the right way? How about for free?
Ippatsu // Japanesetesting.com

mithrila
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RE: note on the ha vs wa question

Post by mithrila » Sun 07.10.2005 10:33 pm

Here's a note on the ha vs wa question. It used to be before women figured out hiragana, that some kanji were used in place of the particles because they had the sorta-kinda same reading. The sounds for W, F, H were represented by the same set of kanji, the ones that eventually became the hiragana set for the h's. You just knew by context which sounds they met. However, when women came with hiragana, they reilized the idiocy of the system and created the seperate w's. However, to not screw up the minds of thier male counterparts, they kept the kanji that had been traditionally used for partical wa.

There is your Japanese history lesson for the day.:D
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