Learn Japanese with JapanesePod101.com

I think と思います

Oni's picture

This goes at the end to show that you believe what you say, but are not 100% sure. It is also used to show one's opinion.  If there is a desu change it to da which is the more casual form and add to omoimasu

1. The speaker is not totally sure of the accuracy of his info...

熊のプーさん は くま だ と 思います
kuma no pu-san wa kuma da to omoimasu.
Winnie the Pooh is a bear, I think...

Next is an example of showing one's opinion.  It is true for the speaker, but may not be so for the listener.

なっとう は おいしい と 思います
nattou wa oishii to omoimasu.
I think Natto is delicious.

Basically you can say any sentence and if you want to soften it or show you are not sure, or show your opinion add to omoimasu

 

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

This is confusing!

In the question asked for omitting da the reply given is that it would be gramatically incorrect to do so. But in the reply と思います isn't negative
彼は猫が好きだと思います。
kare wa neko ga suki da to omoimasu.
I think he likes cats.

(notice I added the copula--but it could be dropped in casual speech, I think.)
Here you are referring to da isn't it? So actually can we drop da or not?

whizkid's picture

yeah you can. and it will

yeah you can. and it will have the same meaning but a different nuance.

(noun) or (na-adjective) with と思う

It's possible that there are dialects where you could do that, and surely it's done in haste the way that text-speak is totally ungrammatical and yet comprehensible, and of course it's done by mistake.

However, in the standard dialect, at any level of formality it's ungrammatical to omit the だ in a sentence like '彼は猫が好きだと思う'.

http://www.guidetojapanese.org/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=41293#p41293

In と言います you can have both in some cases, but it generally drastically changes the meaning, not just the nuance, and I don't think it works with 彼は猫が好きだ.

It does works with
彼は田中さんだと言います (He says 'It's Tanaka.')
彼は田中さんと言います (His name is Tanaka).

More related here, http://www.guidetojapanese.org/quotation.html#part3
and here http://www.guidetojapanese.org/polite.html#part5

Is is also possible that in the context of writing a novel or telling a story or some such there could be a reason to omit the だ after a noun or na-adjective, but I can't construct such a sentence and suspect almost all such sentences would be direct quotes rather than indirect quotes. That is, 魚だと思った (He thought it was a fish.) or 「魚」と思った (He thought 'Fish'.) but I can't imagine when you'd use a grammar like 魚と思った and not be as ungrammatical as 'He thought fish'.

Is this correct? kanojo wa

Is this correct?
kanojo wa kirei da to omoimasu (I think she is pretty)
Also I could not understand your answer for I dont think so. Could you please explain it again?

Metcaslix's picture

Indeed

Yes, that is indeed correct.

Since the article has changed, I'm not sure what you mean by your question.
Was it for: そう思いません。?

This says Sou omoimasen. It means I don't think so.
Sou is used as a confirmation word, I believe.

For example, そうです。(Sou desu).
That means: That's right/it.

Sou could merely mean that you are referring to what the person said, and then confirming that it is indeed that thing.

Omoimasen is the polite negative, meaning "don't think".
So: I don't think so.

franzmefix's picture

I dont think so...

How do you say, i don't think so? と思いません(To omoimasen)?

Hard work pays off..

Natto ha oishi kunaito

Natto ha oishi kunaito omoimasu

clay's picture

I think the most natural

I think the most natural response is 違うと思います chigau to omoimasu. I think that's wrong.

TheJapanShop.com- Japanese language learning materials
Checkout our iPhone apps: TheJapanesePage.com/iPhone

franzmefix's picture

Thank you

Thank you sir :)

Hard work pays off..

beginning

cant we use it in the beginning of teh sentence like in english?
also, instead of changing the desu to da...cant we just drop it completely?

Live to eat , don't eat to live :€

chikara's picture

beginning

No and no :)
Verbs come at the end of sentences in Japanese, not at the beginning as in English.
If you omit da the sentence will be grammatically incorrect and won't make sense.

Don't complain to me that people kick you when you're down. It's your own fault for lying there

MilkPudding's picture

O_O

wait. if we cant drop the 'da' then why is there no 'da' in the second sentence?

Because...

Because おいしい is an i-adjective, and i-adjectives are never followed by a だ. They can be followed by です though, just not in this case. だ and です aren't completely interchangable even though they mean the same thing.

In this case is it not affirmative?

Like if I were to say I think I like cats should it be..
猫が好きと思います。 I like cats is 猫が好きです。So I replace です with と思います since です is affirmative but と思います isnt.. is it right?

clay's picture

と思います isn't negative, but

と思います isn't negative, but shows a bit of uncertainty or can be used to soften a statement. It means, "I think..."

So saying, in English, "I think I like cats." is a little odd, isn't it? Maybe a better example would be:
彼は猫が好きだと思います。
kare wa neko ga suki da to omoimasu.
I think he likes cats.

(notice I added the copula--but it could be dropped in casual speech, I think.)

You are doing well! Try memorizing a useful example or two and it may make more sense.

TheJapanShop.com- Japanese language learning materials
Checkout our iPhone apps: TheJapanesePage.com/iPhone

What if you wanted the first

What if you wanted the first verb, or whatever, to be past tense? Like... "I think he loved me..."
Would it be like.. : 彼は私に愛したと思います…
Is it correct?

clay's picture

彼は私を愛していたと思います。 kare wa

彼は私を愛していたと思います。
kare wa watashi o aishiteita to omoimasu.
I think he loved me.

"Love" implies a period of time. You don't love just for an hour. So for 愛 use the ~ている form instead of 愛した:
愛している I love you;
愛していた I loved you.
(of course "I" and "you" are assumed)

TheJapanShop.com- Japanese language learning materials
Checkout our iPhone apps: TheJapanesePage.com/iPhone

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.