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Japanese Beginner Phrases Podcast 7

Beginning Japanese Conversational Phrases #7: Continuing Hobbies

Today's podcast will review how to ask about hobbies and add a new grammatical pattern.

趣味は何ですか? shumi wa nan desu ka? What is your hobby?

趣味はカラオケです。 shumi wa karaoke desu. My hobby is karaoke.

You can drop the 趣味は and just say

カラオケです。 karaoke desu. It's karaoke.

趣味はスポーツです。 shumi wa supo-tsu desu. My hobby is sports.

趣味はコンピューターです。 shumi wa konpyu-ta- desu. My hobby is computers.

Let's make the answer a little more complicated by saying, "My hobby is watching movies."

"Watching movies" is 映画をみること  

"Movies" is 映画 eiga

The を o is a direct object marker

みる miru is a verb meaning 'to see' but adding the こと makes it into a noun phrase.

みること the thing to see.

This may seem complicated, but don't worry. Learn a few examples by heart and later review thegrammar.

趣味は映画をみることです。 shumi wa eiga o miru koto desu. My hobby is watching movies.

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Confusion...

I find these lessons immensely helpful, but I am confused. What do you mean by 'noun phrase?' Is it like in English when '-ing' is added (e.g. Watching)?

音楽が大好きです。

chikara's picture

Re: Confusion...

Yes, in the context of adding こと to a verb it is the same as the English [verb]~ing to give a noun.

Be aware however that in English "watching" can be both a noun, "I enjoy watching TV" and the progressive tense of a verb, "I am watching TV". In Japanese adding こと works for the first case but not the second. For the second case you will learn [verb]~te imasu in a later lesson.

Don't complain to me that people kick you when you're down. It's your own fault for lying there

re: noun phrase

A noun phrase, is any phrase that is turned into a noun by adding certain endings, which can include koto, mono as well as no. (こと 物 の)

When used for verbs it can be roughly equivalent to "ing" but probably closer grammatically to the "Act of running" rather than simply "to run"

You can also use koto for an intangible thing.

面白いこと omoshiroi koto (thing that is interesting / interesting thing)
先生が言ったこと sensei ge itta koto ( thing said by the teacher )

This is useful for turning entire clauses into a noun as well, like the above example.

Tangible things ( like food ) use 物
eg. 食べ物 ( food things )
同じ物 onaji mono ( same things )

chikara's picture

LOL, ninja'ed again :D

LOL, ninja'ed again :D

Don't complain to me that people kick you when you're down. It's your own fault for lying there

LOL

:D

But

You Did beat me on the first one by about a minute :)

chikara's picture

Then I edited it and saved it

Then I edited it and saved it just after you posted your reply :)

Don't complain to me that people kick you when you're down. It's your own fault for lying there

Ah, I see ^__^

Ah, I see ^__^

Dusky321's picture

Whoa

I put a sentence together that was halfway complicated! すみません、I'm just happy!

ありがとうございます!

clay's picture

Great! It is a nice feeling

Great! It is a nice feeling to see improvements. It doesn't happen often, but relish it while you can. :)

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without "koto"

For the "shumi wa eiga o miru koto"... if we drop the "koto", would it still be the same meaning?
"shumi wa eiga o miru.." I mean, can we not make it as a noun? is the sentence still correct?

liza ^___~ v

clay's picture

That is what the 'koto'

That is what the 'koto' does--it makes it into a noun phrase.

You can answer the question differently without 'koto'. For example:

What is your hobby?

映画をよく見ます。
eiga o yoku miru/mimasu.
I often watch movies.

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the phrase for my hobby is watching movies

im not such if its me or not but is eiga being pronounced eigo plz respond thx.

clay's picture

She is saying, "eiga o miru

She is saying, "eiga o miru koto"

The 'o' (を direct object marker) makes it sound like 'eigo,' but it isn't.

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Kudo Masaki's picture

lol

You can still hear her say eiga, she is saying 'eiga o mirukoto' you can still hear the a at the end of eiga quite clearly, but I can see why it would be misheard.

excellent

excellent

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